How to Harvest

Tamarillo

equipment Secatuers

These delicious, tangy fruits ripen in autumn and winter and can go from plae green to rich ripe red in about a week. They are ripe when they develop their full, rich colour - either a deep, dark red or golden orange/yellow depending on variety. Pick fruit individually – cutting stems with secateurs. Once picked, tamarillos will become sweeter after a week or so – if they are allowed to sit around for that long. Cutting them across the middle and scooping out the sweet pulp with a spoon is the generally preferred option but where tools are absent you can score the skin with your thumbnail and prize fruit apart in the middle. The delicious pulp can then be squeezed into a hungry mouth. Tamarillos are used to make jams, juices, chutneys, sauces fruit salads and preserves. They make a superb crumble ingredient either on their own or mixed with a little apple.

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How to Harvest

Feijoas

equipment Hands

Feijoas add a thrill at the start of the colder months with a flavor that is full of summer sweetness. They actually ripen in autumn and winter depending on variety. Fruit fall when ripe but this can result in bruising and poor quality. Plants are often shaken with a tarp on the ground beneath them to catch fruit and cushion their fall. Alternatively you can pick fruit individually by hand – try and pick when they yield slightly rather than feeling as hard as bullets. Once picked, feijoas will become sweeter after a day or so – if they are allowed to sit around for that long. Feijoas are used to make cakes and muffins as well as juices, wines and preserves. Once picked, feijoas will remain good for about a week or so depending on their ripeness when they were harvested. Cutting them across the middle and scooping out the sweet pulp with a spoon is the generally preferred option but where tools are absent you can score the skin with your thumbnail and prize fruit apart in the middle. The delicious pulp can then be squeezed into a hungry mouth.

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How to Harvest

Passionfruit

equipment Secateurs

Passionfruit ripen in summer and autumn and sometimes this delicious bounty goes into winter depending on variety. Passionfruit are ready when they have turned from green to a dark brownish purple or orangey yellow – depending on variety. Ripeness is further indicated when skin can starts to shrivel slightly and appears furrowed. Fruit will fall when ripe but its best if you pick them individually by hand from the vine. Snip them off with a short length of stem. Passionfruit continue to ripen when off the vine and sweetness can improve after a week - depending on the readiness of fruit when they were picked. Store them at room temperature. Cutting them across the middle and scooping out the sweet pulp with a spoon is the generally preferred option but where tools are absent you can score the skin with your thumbnail and prize fruit apart in the middle.

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SEASONAL RECIPES

Fish Stock

We make between 80 to 120 liters of fish stock a week at Fleur’s, it is the base for many of our dishes including our seafood chowder, hot pots and fish pies. Our actual fish chowder has a fresh Bouquet Garni added to the stock.

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SEASONAL RECIPES

Quince & Windfall Apple Jelly

During the 27 years when I lived in Clyde I think I discovered every single Quince  tree in the district. It was one of the many pleasures of living in this rugged area that the miners & pioneering orchardists left the fruit of their labours for us to inherit.  Each old stone cottage had it’s special story to be told through it’s home garden and their orchard.  The miners lettuce, the thyme & the 100 year old trees, apples, quinces, elder, walnuts, japonica apples, almonds (the first to blossom each year) the rose hip now growing wild all over the hills.  In places such as Conroy’s Gully, Blackman’s Road, Tinker’s, Dry Bread Road, Miner’s Lane & so many more.   Beautiful quince do not keep so well but I try to keep bowls of them around for as long as possible as they just smell so good.

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